Prevention Information

everyone has a role to play

Alcohol & Other Drug Misuse Affects Everyone

The misuse of alcohol, tobacco, marijuana & other drugs takes an economic, emotional and psychological toll on individuals, families, schools, workplaces & communities.

Everyone has a role to play…click on your role below to find out how you can help.

Youth Resources

The places where people live, work and go to school can greatly influence the health of your friends, family and community.  Young people — working alongside residents, community coalitions, businesses and other leaders —can make their communities healthier by addressing substance use issues and advocating for strong prevention programs in their communities and schools.

  • Support community efforts to prevent substance use and participate in community activities that promote healthy behaviors – join your local community coalition or start one!  Coalition Map
  • Promote prevention at your school by joining or starting a school substance use prevention group.

Above the Influence. It’s a state of mind. It’s about being yourself and not letting negative influence get to you. Pressure to drink, do drugs or do anything that goes against who you are in order to fit in—that’s negative influence. And if you’re one of the teens who want to stay above it, visit Above the Influence

Students Against Destructive Decisions,  a peer-to-peer education, prevention, and activism organization dedicated to preventing destructive decisions, particularly underage drinking, other drug use, risky and impaired driving, teen violence, and teen suicide.

  • Practice different ways of saying no when people try to get you to do things that you don’t really want to do.
  • Even if your family provides a warm, caring, supportive place to grow, also seek support through adults in your school, community organizations, or faith community. The more positive adult relationships you have, the better.
  • Let your friends know that you are available when they need someone to talk to. If they need it, help them get additional assistance from a counselor, social worker, parent, or other adult.
  • Spend time with people that help make your future dreams and plans come true.
  • Remember that younger kids see you as a role model.  Be sure your actions show younger kids how to be kind and to make healthy choices.
  • If someone is being a bully to you or someone else, ask him or her to stop. If that doesn’t work, tell an adult. 
Parent Resources

Have the Talk with your Kids in the New Year

A new year calls for new beginnings and new conversations. Some of the more difficult conversations are the ones that parents have with their children pertaining to alcohol and drug use. Nevertheless, they are important talks to have. Research tells us that teens who are educated about the risks of drugs from their parents are less likely to use. In fact, most teens credit conversations with Mom and Dad as their main reason for deciding not to do drugs.

But having those conversations can be challenging as many parents are not sure what to say, or when and how to say it. As you embark on your conversation, keep these four things in mind:  

  • DO start conversations early – well before the teen years. Talking to your kids about alcohol and drug use shouldn’t wait until they reach their teen years. Conversations with younger children may focus on examples of healthy behaviors. As children get older, these conversations should focus more on what your children are seeing and experiencing in social settings
     
  • DO ask thoughtful questions. Because their brains are still developing, teens don’t judge risks and consequences the way adults do. Most teenagers understand the dangers of substance use, but they tend to underestimate those dangers when weighing the pros and cons. One way to talk about their perceptions of drug use is to ask about what they see on TV, in movies or on the Internet. Questions like “How do you think substance use is portrayed?” and “How realistic is it?” can spark a meaningful dialogue
     
  • DO set some ground rules for your teen. We recommend setting the “No substance use before age 21” rule, and providing clear reasons for why you don’t want your teen to smoke, drink or use drugs. Some factors may include:

1) Drugs are dangerous for young people and particularly risky because their brains are still developing
2) Drugs do not mix well with school, sports and other teenage activities
3) It is illegal for minors to drink, smoke or use drugs

  • DON’T forget that conversation is a two-way street. The goal is not to lecture but to get your child talking, and actively listen when they do. Good listening means paying attention without interrupting, not reacting defensively or in anger. If your children believe that their feelings make sense to you, and that you legitimately understand them, they will be more likely to communicate openly with you

Finally, it is important to listen carefully to your kids’ ideas about why substance use is, or is not, risky – they may surprise you.

To learn more, you can view the “How to Raise a Drug-Free Kid” presentation here, which offers 10 facets of parental engagement for talking to your kids about drugs and alcohol.

This blog was written by staff at The National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse.


Resources for Parents

Our kids are surrounded by unhealthy choices including choices about using alcohol, tobacco and other drugs - and youth are bombarded with messages encouraging them to make those unhealthy choices. 

A child who gets to age TWENTY-ONE without smoking, using illegal drugs, or abusing alcohol is virtually certain never to do so...and kids who learn about drugs from their parents are much more likely to resist these temptations.

So, don’t rely on school and other kids to teach your children, you can make the difference…

Many teens report that:

their PARENTS have the greatest influence on their drug use attitudes and decisions and

they don’t use alcohol, tobacco or other drugs simply because they do want to disappoint their parents. 

Kids who continue to learn about the risks of drugs at home are up to 50% less likely to use drugs than those who are not taught about these dangers.

What is a parent to do?  Plenty!

The problem is that we don’t tell our children often enough what we think about underage drinking or the use of other illegal drugs or set clear rules for them.   (And it takes more than one talk)  They in turn mistake our silence to mean that we don’t care if they use or we approve of youth using alcohol, tobacco or other drugs.  A conversation in the hallway, in the car ride home or on the field can make a difference.

The BEST thing you can do is talk to your kids, early and often about your values, concerns and family rules about substance use.

Begin talking with your child today – starting at age 2 or 3 is not too young – many teens who use alcohol, tobacco and marijuana report their first use being when they were 11 or 12 years old.  Waiting until middle school to have “the talk” with some kids is way too late.  And keep talking with them well into their adulthood- the human brain and body is not fully developed until we are nearly 25 years old.

Talking to your kids is a resource to help you talk to your kids about nicotine, alcohol and other drugs.

Building Blocks for a Healthy Future  - for parents and caregivers of children ages 3 to 6- to help you open up the lines of communication with young children—and make it easier to keep those lines of communication open as they grow older. 

Kids are surrounded by pressures and influences. Make sure you are armed with the latest and most accurate info—so you can be the best influence possible. - See more at Parent Up VT

Tips for Dads

Tips for dads on talking to your teens 

How to talk to your Teen about Marijuana  

Is it possible for teens to become addicted to marijuana?

The 20 minute guide – the leading research-supported way for families to help their substance using loved ones. 

 

Positive Parenting Prevents Drug Abuse - Take the Family Checkup 

Learn about which parenting skills are important in preventing the initiation and progression of drug use among youth.

How the answer your kids when they ask, “Did you ever do drugs or drink?”
For many parents, the answer is simply “no.” Other parents will want to scream “awkward!”  But experts believe that honesty if the best policy.  So, when they  are old enough, if you choose to share your story with your kids – be sure to tell them why you were attracted to drugs, alcohol or tobacco, why using them is dangerous, and let your child why it is important to you that they don’t use – but it is not necessary or appropriate to share details. Most likely, your child is only looking for a reason to support their own interest in using.  If you admit to your own past use they will assume that it is okay for them.  If you didn’t use they will just assume that you were a nerd and could never understand what it’s like to be a teen today.  The point you want to make clear is that this issue is not about your past, but her/his future.  They need to know how you feel about alcohol, tobacco and other drug use, what your family rules about use are and the consequences for breaking the rules.

What To Say if You Were Once Addicted   

Additional ways parents can contribute to making your community drug-free:

  • Get informed about the scope of the substance use problem in your community.

Are you familiar with how alcohol and other drug use effects local residents? 

Click below to see statistics for youth in your school district http://healthvermont.gov/research/yrbs/2013/district_results.aspx

Find statistics for adults in your region/community:

Information on risk behaviors in Vermont including alcohol, marijuana and prescription drug use from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance system.  Reported by each Health Department District Office region.

Substance Abuse Treatment data for all ages, gender, county & substances 

 Your local community coalition or Prevention Consultant can tell you more about the substance use issues in the community. Link to Coalition Map

  • Learn more about prevention. You can do this by attending a training session, reading about prevention and talking with others who know about substance use.
  • Lend your voice and time to a local coalition working on these issues –  join your local community coalition or start one!  Link to Coalition Map
  • Plan a town hall meeting to inform your community about youth substance use in your community.
  • Connect with other parents who are interested in prevention.   Form relationships in your neighborhood, on the job, at church, or through a parent education organization.
  • Ask groups that you are already a member of (PTSO, Masons, Kiwanis, Rotary, etc.) to address substance use issues.
  • Avoid binge drinking, use of illicit drugs, or the misuse of prescription medications and, as needed, seek help from their clinician for substance abuse disorders.
  • Avoid driving if drinking alcohol or after taking any drug (illicit, prescription, or over-the-counter) that can alter their ability to operate a motor vehicle.
  • Refrain from supplying underage youth with alcohol and ensure that youth cannot access alcohol in your home.
  • Encourage your child to find or spend time with friends who have a positive effect on their life.
  • Teach "life" skills, such as refusal, negotiation, and decision-making skills - hHelp teens practice saying “no,” so if they are invited to smoke or drink alcohol they will have a quick and confident reply.  Tell them what worked for you – saying "My parents would kill me," and help them find what works for them – “No thanks, that’s not for me.”
  • Set limits, monitor your child’s whereabouts and enforce rules about smoking (tobacco and marijuana) and underage drinking and don’t allow any substance use in your home. 
  • Commit to doing simple things like eating at least one meal together as a family every day, asking your child questions and really listening to their answers, complimenting them when they do something right, and scheduling time together.  Learn the 9 Facets of Parental Engagement 
  • Set high expectations for success and commend your child for his strengths and talents as opposed to problems and deficits.
  • Provide opportunities for meaningful involvement at home and in the community to hold responsibilities, make decisions, speak up, be heard, and contribute one’s talents to their family and community.
  • Know Your Child’s Risk Level - Several decades of research shows that some teens are more at risk for developing a substance abuse problem than other teens. 

Talk to your child’s doctor to make sure they are screening your children to prevent risky substance use and/or behavior.  And don’t ever ignore risk factors and assume your child will be okay or just ignore a problem because you think it is a “stage” they are going through.  If you notice something, seek help.  (Good places to start looking for help are the school counselor or your child’s pediatrician)  

  • Provide healthy alternatives for coping with stress (exercise, mindfulness, sports, drug-free social activities).
  • Discuss and set family rules and consequences for breaking those rules.
  • If you are parenting alone, look for other adult role models of both genders who can be mentors for your child.
  • Do intergenerational activities with extended family and with other neighborhood adults and families.
  • Give teens an escape route.  Teach them how to get out of a bad situation.

Suggest a response they can use so they don’t feel “uncool.”

  • “I don’t want to ruin my season/get in trouble with the coach.”
  • “I have to do something with my parents really early tomorrow morning.”
  • “I’m the designated driver.”
  • “I’m not interested.”
  • “No, thanks.”
  • Most people don’t keep track of their medications
    • Monitor all medications in the home—prescription and OTC medicines  - and do not share with others.
    • Safely store medicines out of children’s reach and sight.  Consider locking them up.
    • Get rid of old or unused medicines.

Remember that you are not alone. Other caring adults in your children’s lives include coaches, childcare providers, teachers, club leaders, and neighbors.  Work with these people to give kids consistent messages about alcohol and other drug use. 

Whether television, movies, cell phones or social media, the role of media in the lives of our teens continues to grow.

Studies have found that the more young people are exposed to alcohol and tobacco advertising and marketing, the more likely they are to drink or smoke, or if already using, drinking or smoking more.

You can help your teen navigate the fast and furious media world by:

  • Improving their ability to read between the lines of advertising, recognize the influence of media messages and resist pressures from advertising and other media to smoke, drink or use drugs;
  • Encourage them to think about what ads, tv shows and movies are trying to “sell” them;
  • Help them analyze how realistic teens in their favorite tv shows and movies really are; and 
  • Build their communication skills by talking with them about what they see and how they feel about it.

Visit Too Smart To Start to learn more. 

As a parent, you know the importance of your teen's social life and that parties are a way to socialize and relax. But an unsupervised or poorly planned party can result in unwanted or even tragic consequences – Check out the Parent's Guide to Teen Parties   

 

Resources especially for parents

http://hctv.us/2014/05/michael-nerney-time-to-talk-about-youth-drugs-brains-and-behavior/

 

Why Do Teens Act This Way? 

A four-minute video on adolescent brain development

For ratings and reviews of books, movies, videogames and apps that include age appropriateness, violence and references to alcohol, tobacco and other drugs check out CommonSense Media  www.Commonsensemedia.org

National Clearinghouse for Alcohol and Drug Information

Drugs That People Abuse  

Underage Drinking:  Myths vs. Facts

About E-Cigarettes

Spit Tobacco: A Guide for Quitting

Drug Facts – Inhalants - Provides an overview of inhalants, such as types of products commonly inhaled, how they affect the brain, other adverse effects on health, and the scope of use of inhalants in the U.S.

DXM: Make Up Your Own Mind - Draw your own conclusions about DXM/cough syrup. All information comes directly from medical research, reliable news sources, and from people who have abused DXM.

Marijuana: Facts Parents Need to Know  

Marijuana Abuse – Explores the latest research on marijuana, including the scope of marijuana use in the U.S., health consequences, its effects on every-day activities, available treatments.

Grandparent Resources

Resources for Grandparents

The places where people live, work and go to school can greatly influence the health of community members.  Grandparents and senior citizens--working alongside youth, community coalitions, businesses and other leaders—can make their communities healthier by addressing substance use issues and advocating for strong prevention programs in their communities and schools. 

What Can Grandparents & Senior Citizens Do to Support Drug-Free Communities?

  • Get informed about the scope of the substance use problem in your community.

Are you familiar with how alcohol and other drug use effects local residents? 

Click below to see statistics for youth in your school district http://healthvermont.gov/research/yrbs/2013/district_results.aspx

 Click below to see statistics for adults in your region/community
…I need to get this link – was having a problem navigating the VDH system

Your local community coalition or Prevention Consultant can tell you more about the substance use issues in the community. Coalition Map

  • Support community efforts to prevent substance use and community activities that promote healthy behaviors – join your local community coalition or start one! Coalition Map
  • Find out how to better communicate with your teenage grandchild; learn about the latest drugs; and discover how you can keep your grandchild healthy. Grandparent's Guide 
  • Building Blocks for a Healthy Future is an early childhood substance abuse prevention program developed to educate parents and caregivers about the basics of prevention to promote healthy lifestyles.
  • Avoid binge drinking, use of illicit drugs, or the misuse of prescription medications and, as needed, seek help from their clinician for substance abuse disorders.
  • Safely store and properly dispose of prescription medications and not share prescription drugs with others.
  • Avoid driving if drinking alcohol or after taking any drug (illicit, prescription, or over-the-counter) that can alter their ability to operate a motor vehicle.
  • Refrain from supplying underage youth with alcohol and ensure that youth cannot access alcohol in their home.
  • Talk about your values, your priorities, and world issues that concern you. Emphasize why these things are important to you and how they influence your life. 
  • Reach out to the children and youth in your family, whether they are your grandchildren, great-grandchildren, nieces and nephews, grandnieces and grandnephews, or other relatives. Send letters and e-mail messages, visit, phone them, or invite them to your home. Let them know your door is open if they want or need you.
  • Introduce yourself to the children and youth who live near you. Learn their names and greet them when you see them.
  • Volunteer at a childcare center, school, or church activity for children and youth.
  • Become a “foster grandparent” for a family that doesn’t have grandparents or whose grandparents live far away.
  • If you had a special older person in your life when you were a child, think about the things that made that relationship special. Offer young people in your life some of those same gifts.

Begin talking with your grandchild today – starting at age 2 or 3 is not too young – many teens who use alcohol, tobacco and marijuana report their first use being when they were 11 or 12 years old.  Waiting until middle school to have “the talk” with some kids is way too late.  And keep talking with them well into their adulthood- the human brain and body is not fully developed until well into our twenties. 

Talking to your kids is a resource to help you talk to your grandkids about nicotine, alcohol and other drugs.

Kids are surrounded by pressures and influences. Make sure you are armed with the latest and most accurate info—so you can be the best influence possible. - See more at Parent Up VT

What To Say if You Were Once Addicted  Talking About Drugs

Business & Employer Resources

The places where people live, work and go to school can greatly influence the health of community members.  Local business owners --working alongside residents, community coalitions, businesses and other leaders—can make their communities healthier by addressing substance use issues and advocating for strong prevention programs in their communities and schools. 

What Can Businesses Do to Support Drug-Free Communities?

  • Get informed about the scope of the substance use problem in your community.

Do you know how alcohol and other drug use effects your community? 

Click here to see statistics for youth in your school district http://healthvermont.gov/research/yrbs/2013/district_results.aspx

Find statistics for adults in your region/community:

Information on risk behaviors in Vermont including alcohol, marijuana and prescription drug use from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance system.  Reported by each Health Department District Office region.

Substance Abuse Treatment data for all ages, gender, county & substances 

Your local community coalition or Prevention Consultant can present to your employees about the substance use issues in the community. View Coalition Map

  • Use your resources to educate youth and adults about the risks of drug abuse (including prescription misuse) and excessive drinking.

-  Some businesses offer parent education sessions at the lunch hour, sponsor Employee Assistance Programs (EAP), include notices in paychecks, and information on corporate websites. 

  • Support community efforts to prevent substance use and community activities that promote healthy behaviors – join your local community coalition or start one!  View Coalition Map
  • Do not allow alcohol to be sold or advertised at events promoted as “family friendly”.
  • Increase awareness on the proper storage and disposal of prescription medications.
  • Contribute to substance-free activities to minimize problems on high-risk holidays (for example New Years Eve, 4th of July and Halloween).
  • Develop or review your Drug-Free Workplace Policy. 

Drug Free Workplace Kit: Develop a Policy website provides information on drug-free workplace laws and regulations, basic elements of an effective policy, and resources for developing a policy 

  • Build, review or redesign your workplace health program with a planned, organized, and comprehensive set of programs, policies, benefits, and environmental supports designed to meet the health and safety needs of all employees. 

Worksite health-related programs for employees that reduce alcohol and substance misuse

Employee health benefits are part of an overall compensation package and affect an employee’s willingness to seek preventive services and clinical care.

Designing a worksite that promotes health and can reduce alcohol and drug misuse.

  • Help secure additional funding sources to support your community’s prevention efforts—either by allocating local government funds or by promoting the importance of substance abuse prevention work to potential funders.

Workplace Prevention Resource List:

vadic-logo.gifVADIC  provides communities with informational resources pertaining to substance abuse and at-risk issues. VADIC is a grant-funded program, and its services are free for Vermonters.    Request materials online or Toll-Free: 1 (800) 769-2798.

 

SAMHSA: Division of Workplace Programs

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) provides oversight for the Federal Drug-Free Workplace Program aimed at elimination of illicit drug use in the federal workforce. 

drugfreehelpline.gifWorkplace Helpline 1-800-WORKPLACE

The Helpline provides telephone consultation to assist employers and union representatives with policy development, drug testing, employee assistance, employee education, supervisor training, and program implementation. It offers resource referrals and free publications. Helpline information specialists are trained to provide information tailored to each organization's unique characteristics. Lists of drug testing labs certified by the Department of Health and Human Services are available free of charge, and networking help is available for finding a medical review officer (MRO).

National Registry of Evidence-based Programs and Practices Model Programs for the Workplace (NREPP) provides specific techniques and interventions that have been carefully implemented and evaluated and shown positive outcomes     

Workplace Health Promotion

This site is a toolkit for workplace health promotion and protection professionals. Use this site to learn about how to design, implement, and evaluate effective workplace health programs.

Education Resources

The places where people live, work and go to school can greatly influence the health of community members.  Health care providers—working alongside residents, community coalitions, businesses and other leaders—can make their communities healthier by addressing substance use issues and advocating for strong prevention programs in their communities and schools.

What Can Education Professionals Do to Support Drug-Free Communities?

  • Get informed about the scope of the substance use problem in your community.

Educators are well aware of the problems that confront their communities, but may not be familiar with how alcohol and other drug use effects local residents. 

Click here to see statistics for youth in your school district http://healthvermont.gov/research/yrbs/2015/index.aspx

Substance Use & Its Impact on Academic Success

 Find statistics for adults in your region/community:

Information on risk behaviors in Vermont including alcohol, marijuana and prescription drug use from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance system.  Reported by each Health Department District Office region.

Substance Abuse Treatment data for all ages, gender, county & substances

Your local community coalition or Prevention Consultant can present to your school or organization about the substance use issues in the community. Link to Coalition Map

  • Support community efforts to prevent substance use and community activities that promote healthy behaviors – join your local community coalition or start one!  Link to Coalition Map
  • Utilize existing health promotion and prevention programs/parent outreach to educate youth and adults about the risks of drug abuse (including prescription misuse) and excessive drinking.

-  Some organizations include articles and notices in organization newsletters, on partner websites and in advertising.

  • Talk to students and their families about drug-taking behaviors, especially with those who show signs of being at risk for misusing or abusing drugs.
  • Turn your classroom or office into an area that promotes prevention and drug-free lifestyles.  Include information about your local community coalition and local parenting classes.   And avoid posting advertising, cartoons, etc. that promotes unhealthy behavior.
  • Help identify Rx drug abuse and help teens and their parents recognize any problems early on.  Consult with the Student Assistance Counselor or Guidance Counselor about students or families you are concerned about.
  • Monitor drug trends in your school and provide information on emerging drug trends (including changes in substance use patterns and substance-related overdoses) to your local community coalition.
  • Increase awareness on the proper storage and disposal of prescription medications.
  • Include discussion of substance abuse as a part of routine health care and as part of ongoing health education. The CRAFFT screen is a valid, reliable, and developmentally appropriate tool for accomplishing the recommended yearly screening, and teens who screen positive can be referred for comprehensive evaluation and treatment.
  • Share information about prevention with parents on a regular basis in newsletters, school website and social media.
  • Promote substance-free activities for students and families especially on high-risk holidays (for example New Years Eve, 4th of July and Halloween).  Some communities have extra law enforcement on patrol, host substance-free events as an alternative and request traffic stops/sobriety check points.
  • Adopt policies and programs to decrease the use of alcohol or other drugs on campuses.
  • Implement programs for reducing drug abuse and excessive alcohol use (e.g., student assistance programs, parent networking, or peer-to-peer support groups).
  • Offer training to staff and volunteers to assist in noticing and reporting substance use problems in schools.
  • Support local prevention efforts with financial, human, or in-kind resources.

An ounce of prevention is … a lot of work and the best prevention is early and evidence-based. 

Effective alcohol, tobacco and other drug prevention programs: 

  • Conduct life skills training, including refusal and resistance skills, decision making, goal setting, assertiveness, bullying prevention, coping and communication; 
  • Increase awareness about media and advertising influences, particularly regarding substance use and abuse; and 
  • Avoid short-term interventions but employ multi-setting interventions, including school, family, media and community.

Click here for more information on evidence-based prevention of alcohol, tobacco and other drug use.

http://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/preventing-drug-abuse-among-children-adolescents/acknowledgments

School Prevention Resource List:

This 2015 report to the VT Legislature summarizes the elements of a school-based substance abuse prevention program, and Vermont’s school quality standards for health education related to this topic area.

http://education.vermont.gov/documents/Report_Act75_01_08_15_SubstanceAbusePrevention.pdf

School Connectedness: Strategies for Increasing Protective Factors  Among Youth

Strategies for school personnel and others to use in helping students' feel more connected to their school and promoting healthy behaviors.

http://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth/protective/pdf/connectedness.pdf

vadic-logo.gifVADIC  provides communities with informational resources pertaining to substance abuse and at-risk issues. VADIC is a grant-funded program, and its services are free for Vermonters.    Request materials online or Toll-Free: 1 (800) 769-2798.

Find the latest science-based information about the health effects and consequences of drug abuse and addiction and resources for talking with kids about the impact of drug use on health.   http://www.drugabuse.gov/parents-educators

Commonly Abused Drugs and their Health Risks

http://www.drugabuse.gov/drugs-abuse/commonly-abused-drugs-charts-0

Drugs That People Abuse – easy to read

http://easyread.drugabuse.gov/drugs-of-abuse.php

SAMHSA (Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration) provides a wide variety of publications and resources to help with reducing the impact of substance abuse and mental illness.   http://store.samhsa.gov/

Marijuana Abuse – Explores the latest research on marijuana, including the scope of marijuana use in the U.S., health consequences, its effects on every-day activities, available treatments.

http://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/research-reports/marijuana-abuse

 

Prevention Resources for Pre-school age students

Why is early childhood important to substance abuse prevention?  Principles of Substance Abuse Prevention for Early Childhood https://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/principles-substance-abuse-prevention-early-childhood/index

Building Blocks for a Healthy Future is an early childhood substance abuse prevention program developed by SAMHSA to educate parents and caregivers about the basics of prevention to promote healthy lifestyles.

What to say to a 2-4 year old

http://www.drugfree.org/the-parent-toolkit/age-by-age-advice/2-4-year-old-what-to-say/

 

Prevention Resources for Elementary age students

This website hosted by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) offers free resources for teachers     http://www.drugabuse.gov/free-resources-teachers-elementary-school

What to say to a 5-8 year old

http://www.drugfree.org/the-parent-toolkit/age-by-age-advice/5-8-year-old-what-to-say/

What to say to a 9-12 year old 

http://www.drugfree.org/the-parent-toolkit/age-by-age-advice/9-12-year-old-what-to-say/

 

Prevention Resources for Middle School age students

Why Do Teens Act This Way?  http://www.drugfree.org/why-do-teens-act-this-way/  A four-minute video on adolescent brain development

What to say to a 13-15 year old

http://www.drugfree.org/the-parent-toolkit/age-by-age-advice/13-15-year-old-what-to-say/

Transitions: The first year of middle school.  Tips for guiding youth through middle school.

http://www.cls.umd.edu/docs/AcadOppCosts.pdf

Resources for Elected Officials

The places where people live, work and go to school can greatly influence the health of community members.  Local decision-makers — working alongside residents, community coalitions, businesses and other leaders — can make their communities healthier by addressing substance use issues and advocating for strong prevention programs in their communities and schools.

What Can Elected Officials Do to Support Drug-Free Communities?

  • Get informed about the scope of the substance use problem in your community.

Elected officials are well aware of the problems that confront their communities, but may not be familiar with how alcohol and other drug use effects local residents. 

Click here to see statistics for youth in your school district http://healthvermont.gov/research/yrbs/2013/district_results.aspx

Find statistics for adults in your region/community:

Information on risk behaviors in Vermont including alcohol, marijuana and prescription drug use from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance system.  Reported by each Health Department District Office region.

Substance Abuse Treatment data for all ages, gender, county & substances 

Your local community coalition or Prevention Consultant can present to your board or commission about the substance use issues in the community. View Coalition Map

  • Support implementation and enforcement of alcohol and drug control policies including:
    • Municipalities in Vermont have the ability to restrict the locations of any retailer selling products that minors may not purchase or possess, including marijuana retailers.
    • Strong and clear regulations to limit the number and location of alcohol, tobacco, paraphernalia and marijuana outlets within towns/cities.
    • Monitoring alcohol & tobacco retailers to ensure minors are not being served;
    • Passing ordinances to guarantee smoke-free places in public areas and at community events;
    • Ensuring the town has policies governing use of alcohol in public buildings and at community events.
    • Enact and enforce Social host liability laws – strict penalties and fines for furnishing alcohol, or other drugs to minors. (Most underage alcohol and tobacco sales are known sales (id is stores.)
  • Carefully Monitor alcohol and tobacco licenses and licensees to prevent sales to minors.

Click here to see results from compliance checks conducted by the VT Department of Liquor Control http://liquorcontrol.vermont.gov/enforcement/compliance

Click here to see if any stores in your town have had their license suspended http://liquorcontrol.vermont.gov/enforcement/suspendedlicenses

  • Implement strict restrictions on advertising and promotion- that include, but may not be limited to: sponsorships or depictions in public entertainment venues.
  • Use your resources to educate youth and adults about the risks of drug abuse (including prescription misuse) and excessive drinking.
  • Some communities include articles and notices in community newsletters, on town websites and in the annual Town Report and tax bills
  • Support community efforts to prevent substance use and community activities that promote healthy behaviors – join your local community coalition or start one!  View Coalition Map
  • Do not allow alcohol to be sold or advertised at public events.
  • Work with media outlets and retailers to reduce alcohol, tobacco and marijuana marketing to youth.
  • Increase awareness on the proper storage and disposal of prescription medications.

If there is not a location near you, consider creating one in partnership with your local police department or Sheriff’s office.

  • Consider prevention strategies to minimize problems on high-risk holidays (for example New Years Eve, 4th of July and Halloween).  Some communities have extra law enforcement on patrol, host substance-free events as an alternative and request traffic stops/sobriety check points.
  • Help secure additional funding sources to support your community’s prevention efforts—either by allocating local government funds or by promoting the importance of substance abuse prevention work to potential funders.

100 State Street, Suite 352
Montpelier, VT 05602
Tel: 802-279-4309
preventionworksvt@gmail.com

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